From Amazon

Wanted to share this – from Amazon – please help if you can

Just ahead of World War II, there was a radical invention that shook the foundations of book publishing. It was the paperback book. This was a time when movie tickets cost 10 or 20 cents, and books cost $2.50. The new paperback cost 25 cents – it was ten times cheaper. Readers loved the paperback and millions of copies were sold in just the first year.

With it being so inexpensive and with so many more people able to afford to buy and read books, you would think the literary establishment of the day would have celebrated the invention of the paperback, yes? Nope. Instead, they dug in and circled the wagons. They believed low cost paperbacks would destroy literary culture and harm the industry (not to mention their own bank accounts). Many bookstores refused to stock them, and the early paperback publishers had to use unconventional methods of distribution – places like newsstands and drugstores. The famous author George Orwell came out publicly and said about the new paperback format, if “publishers had any sense, they would combine against them and suppress them.” Yes, George Orwell was suggesting collusion.

Well… history doesn’t repeat itself, but it does rhyme.

Fast forward to today, and it’s the e-book’s turn to be opposed by the literary establishment. Amazon and Hachette – a big US publisher and part of a $10 billion media conglomerate – are in the middle of a business dispute about e-books. We want lower e-book prices. Hachette does not. Many e-books are being released at $14.99 and even $19.99. That is unjustifiably high for an e-book. With an e-book, there’s no printing, no over-printing, no need to forecast, no returns, no lost sales due to out of stock, no warehousing costs, no transportation costs, and there is no secondary market – e-books cannot be resold as used books. E-books can and should be less expensive.

Perhaps channeling Orwell’s decades old suggestion, Hachette has already been caught illegally colluding with its competitors to raise e-book prices. So far those parties have paid $166 million in penalties and restitution. Colluding with its competitors to raise prices wasn’t only illegal, it was also highly disrespectful to Hachette’s readers.

The fact is many established incumbents in the industry have taken the position that lower e-book prices will “devalue books” and hurt “Arts and Letters.” They’re wrong. Just as paperbacks did not destroy book culture despite being ten times cheaper, neither will e-books. On the contrary, paperbacks ended up rejuvenating the book industry and making it stronger. The same will happen with e-books.

Many inside the echo-chamber of the industry often draw the box too small. They think books only compete against books. But in reality, books compete against mobile games, television, movies, Facebook, blogs, free news sites and more. If we want a healthy reading culture, we have to work hard to be sure books actually are competitive against these other media types, and a big part of that is working hard to make books less expensive.

Moreover, e-books are highly price elastic. This means that when the price goes down, customers buy much more. We’ve quantified the price elasticity of e-books from repeated measurements across many titles. For every copy an e-book would sell at $14.99, it would sell 1.74 copies if priced at $9.99. So, for example, if customers would buy 100,000 copies of a particular e-book at $14.99, then customers would buy 174,000 copies of that same e-book at $9.99. Total revenue at $14.99 would be $1,499,000. Total revenue at $9.99 is $1,738,000. The important thing to note here is that the lower price is good for all parties involved: the customer is paying 33% less and the author is getting a royalty check 16% larger and being read by an audience that’s 74% larger. The pie is simply bigger.

But when a thing has been done a certain way for a long time, resisting change can be a reflexive instinct, and the powerful interests of the status quo are hard to move. It was never in George Orwell’s interest to suppress paperback books – he was wrong about that.

And despite what some would have you believe, authors are not united on this issue. When the Authors Guild recently wrote on this, they titled their post: “Amazon-Hachette Debate Yields Diverse Opinions Among Authors” (the comments to this post are worth a read).  A petition started by another group of authors and aimed at Hachette, titled “Stop Fighting Low Prices and Fair Wages,” garnered over 7,600 signatures.  And there are myriad articles and posts, by authors and readers alike, supporting us in our effort to keep prices low and build a healthy reading culture. Author David Gaughran’s recent interview is another piece worth reading.

We recognize that writers reasonably want to be left out of a dispute between large companies. Some have suggested that we “just talk.” We tried that. Hachette spent three months stonewalling and only grudgingly began to even acknowledge our concerns when we took action to reduce sales of their titles in our store. Since then Amazon has made three separate offers to Hachette to take authors out of the middle. We first suggested that we (Amazon and Hachette) jointly make author royalties whole during the term of the dispute. Then we suggested that authors receive 100% of all sales of their titles until this dispute is resolved. Then we suggested that we would return to normal business operations if Amazon and Hachette’s normal share of revenue went to a literacy charity. But Hachette, and their parent company Lagardere, have quickly and repeatedly dismissed these offers even though e-books represent 1% of their revenues and they could easily agree to do so. They believe they get leverage from keeping their authors in the middle.

We will never give up our fight for reasonable e-book prices. We know making books more affordable is good for book culture. We’d like your help. Please email Hachette and copy us.

Hachette CEO, Michael Pietsch: Michael.Pietsch@hbgusa.com

Copy us at: readers-united@amazon.com

Please consider including these points:

– We have noted your illegal collusion. Please stop working so hard to overcharge for ebooks. They can and should be less expensive.
– Lowering e-book prices will help – not hurt – the reading culture, just like paperbacks did.
– Stop using your authors as leverage and accept one of Amazon’s offers to take them out of the middle.
– Especially if you’re an author yourself: Remind them that authors are not united on this issue.

Thanks for your support.

The Amazon Books Team

P.S. You can also find this letter at www.readersunited.com

 

Deadline countdown

Our pleas for mercy seem to have fallen on deaf ears as the entries for the equestrian short story competition are now pouring in.

Sam at Haynet and I are going to have a huge task trying to pick a winner from the incredibly professional submissions we have seen so far.

It’s not too late though if you haven’t got around to writing your entry yet, the competition doesn’t close until the 11th of August, so still time if you decide to put pen to paper, or fingers on keyboards as it is more likely to be now.

Here’s the competition details again:-

EQUESTRIAN SHORT STORY COMPETITION 2014

Short_Story_Comp_2014[1]

Have you always dreamed of being an equestrian author? Do you want to help equestrian charities including World  Horse Welfare? Are you a budding Jilly Cooper or the new Dick Francis? Well here is your chance to enter your story in a new Equestrian Short Story Competition sponsored by Haynet and Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing.  This could be the start of a new chapter in your life writing fiction in the equestrian world.

The judges are looking for equestrian themed short stories of approximately 6,000 words long accompanied by a 500 word synopsis. Entrants can let their imagination run wild as long as the subject matter has an equestrian theme. The sponsors would like to see stories that have an equestrian background rather solely about just being a horse. Maybe a crime novel set in the horse world or perhaps a fantasy novel or an equestrian Harry Potter? How about an equestrian romance which is ideal for the Jilly Cooper addicts!

The winning story will have their story published in a form of an e-book which can be purchased and downloaded by the public with donation going to the wonderful equine charities including  World Horse Welfare. The winner will also receive a fantastic Haynet hoody. Two runners up will also have their stories published.

Judges, Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing have a wealth of publishing knowledge and experience in equestrian journalism spanning decades. Haynet is a well-known equestrian blogging network with members from all over the world writing about their lives with horses.

Submissions to The Equestrian Short Story Competition 2014 will be accepted from Tuesday 13th May 2014  and will run for three months giving author’s time to pen, edit and proof read their equine stories. The final deadline is 5pm (GMT) on Monday 11th August 2014.

Further details, plus terms and conditions can be found at http://www.hay-net.co.uk/equestrian-short-story-competition-2014. Please submit your entry by email to haynetblog@hotmail.co.uk

For more details please contact Samantha Hobden from Haynet via email: haynetblog@gmail.com or Jacqueline Smalley from Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing on info@lavenderandwhite.co.uk

www.hay-net.co.uk

www.lavenderandwhite.co.uk

 

mercy!!

Short_Story_Comp_2014[1]

Just spent the weekend reading through the entries that have come in so far for the equestrian short story competition that we are running in conjunction with Haynet. Wow! Can’t believe how good the entries are – it is going to be such a hard job picking one that stands out as a winner.

We are so impressed with the incredible amount of talent that just shines through in all of the entries. They are so well written and absolutely gripping from the first very first words. Each of the entries that have come in so far are so very different from each other, we have read fantasy, romance, children’s stories, crime and true life stories.

We would all like to say a huge thank you to everyone who has submitted entries so far and please – if you are thinking of writing a story and haven’t got around to it yet, please do. There is still time to get your entry into us. If you don’t know where to start, or how to structure your story, we’ve posted a few blogs over the past weeks that will help.

In case you’ve just joined Haynet, or just found the Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing site the judges are looking for equestrian themed short stories of approximately 6,000 words long accompanied by a 500 word synopsis. Entrants can let their imagination run wild as long as the subject matter has an equestrian theme. We would like to see stories that have an equestrian background rather solely about just being a horse. Maybe a crime novel set in the horse world or perhaps a fantasy novel or an equestrian Harry Potter? How about an equestrian romance which is ideal for the Jilly Cooper addicts!

The winning story will have their story published in a form of an e-book which can be purchased and downloaded by the public with donation going to the wonderful equine charities including World Horse Welfare. The winner will also receive a fantastic Haynet hoody. Two runners up will also have their stories published.  This could be the start of a whole new career for the writer of the winning story.

Submissions to The Equestrian Short Story Competition 2014 will be accepted up until the final deadline, 5pm (GMT) on Monday 11th August 2014.

Further details, plus terms and conditions can be found at http://www.hay-net.co.uk/equestrian-short-story-competition-2014. Please submit your entry by email to haynetblog@hotmail.co.uk

Everyone at Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing feels so honoured to be able to be part of this competition and to hopefully raise much needed funds for equestrian charities including World Horse Welfare.

If you aren’t in it you can’t win it…

 

Short_Story_Comp_2014[1]

Less than a month to go now until the closing date of our short story competition. Entries are already coming in and we’ve all been amazed at the incredible talent there is. We are so looking forward to being able to announce the competition winner and hopefully launch the career of a new writer.

 

Here are the details of our competition again, please share and share so that we can spread the word.

EQUESTRIAN SHORT STORY COMPETITION 2014

Have you always dreamed of being an equestrian author? Do you want to help equestrian charities including World  Horse Welfare? Are you a budding Jilly Cooper or the new Dick Francis? Well here is your chance to enter your story in a new Equestrian Short Story Competition sponsored by Haynet and Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing.  This could be the start of a new chapter in your life writing fiction in the equestrian world.

The judges are looking for equestrian themed short stories of approximately 6,000 words long accompanied by a 500 word synopsis. Entrants can let their imagination run wild as long as the subject matter has an equestrian theme. The sponsors would like to see stories that have an equestrian background rather solely about just being a horse. Maybe a crime novel set in the horse world or perhaps a fantasy novel or an equestrian Harry Potter? How about an equestrian romance which is ideal for the Jilly Cooper addicts!

The winning story will have their story published in a form of an e-book which can be purchased and downloaded by the public with donation going to the wonderful equine charities including  World Horse Welfare. The winner will also receive a fantastic Haynet hoody. Two runners up will also have their stories published.

Judges, Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing have a wealth of publishing knowledge and experience in equestrian journalism spanning decades. Haynet is a well-known equestrian blogging network with members from all over the world writing about their lives with horses.

Submissions to The Equestrian Short Story Competition 2014 will be accepted from Tuesday 13th May 2014  and will run for three months giving author’s time to pen, edit and proof read their equine stories. The final deadline is 5pm (GMT) on Monday 11th August 2014.

Further details, plus terms and conditions can be found at http://www.hay-net.co.uk/equestrian-short-story-competition-2014. Please submit your entry by email to haynetblog@hotmail.co.uk

For more details please contact Samantha Hobden from Haynet via email: haynetblog@gmail.com or Jacqueline Smalley from Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing on info@lavenderandwhite.co.uk

www.hay-net.co.uk

www.lavenderandwhite.co.uk

Fabulous forewords

How to have a fabulous foreword

What good is a foreword?

No matter how good your book is the foreword won’t make the slightest bit of difference. It doesn’t contribute any additional information about the book’s subject matter, but it does serve as a way of validating the book and you as the author.

A foreword’s primary purpose is to boost book sales. It’s a means of introducing someone who may not be well known via an expert in the field or a celebrity who, by dint of being famous, is an expert on everything.

writing 1

A book will gain more from having a foreword written by someone that the general public recognizes more readily than the actual author. Added kudos can be gained by giving the foreword’s writer a byline on the cover. ‘With foreword by Ms Horse-Expert’ can actually sell you more copies than the all of the research and knowledge the book contains.

What is a good foreword?

The best forewords have a personal, chatty feel to them. The foreword writer may reminisce about how they know the author, thus adding weight to the author’s credentials.

Forewords also tend to involve anecdotes that– ideally– have something to do with the work at hand. These generally serve as a practical or real-world example of whatever themes or ideas may be expressed later in the book itself.   More importantly they simply reinforce that the writer knows his or her stuff.

But a foreword isn’t just about the book.  It can actually be a valuable a tool for the person writing it as for the author of the actual book. To begin with, writing a foreword keeps the writer’s name in front of the public, providing them with publicity for their own business or projects.  The foreword writer has the opportunity to remind people of why he or she is well known– or at least qualified to write a foreword to a work– in the first place.

How to obtain a great foreword

Certainly not all books have forewords and not all need them. But the right person to write your foreword can help sell your book, just as the back cover blurb does. A good foreword will establish your credibility. The writer should mention how they  knows you and can help establish you as an expert in your field.

writing 2

Having a well-known equestrian celebrity to write your foreword is always great as it can draw readership, as long as the link is clear. Either the person should be an expert in the field that the book covers, or the person should be someone that your core readers tend to highly respect or wish to emulate.  Ideally they should be a person who is well known to your readers, even better if they are known to the rest of the world

Just as your book blurb has to grab the reader’s attention, so does your foreword, so it makes sense to ensure that the writer does a good job. Once you have approached someone suitable and they have said yes, it is perfectly reasonable and very sensible to send them a note, or make a phone call and ask them to touch upon certain points in the book. These could include how they met, why they think the book is good and why it will help with certain issues. Tactfully done this will save your foreword writer time and save you the anguish of having a beautifully written foreword which doesn’t actually do anything to help the book promotion at all.  Once the book is completed make sure that you include the person’s title or credentials next to their name, this is just good manners and professional courtesy.

 

How to write the perfect cover blurb

 

book cover blurb 1

For any author a blurb is the second most important selling tool you have after your cover. That must grab their attention and make them curious – the blurb is what will hook them in and make them interested enough to want to read it

You can also use a blurb as part of a proposal for a publisher, or for editors to use if you persuade them to write about you or your book. A blurb can also be used as content for your website page if you have one.

Writing a cover blurb is hard though and is something I often struggle with. Writing a book blurb or a very short synopsis of your book is almost the same thing as explaining your book in a few short sentences.

.What is the difference between a book blurb and a short synopsis?

If you are making a submission to a publisher you will need both. A synopsis is a summary of the whole story – the beginning, the middle and the end: What happens throughout the story, at the end, how everything is resolved. A blurb on the other hand aims to stimulate interest and curiosity and hopefully persuades the reader’s appetite to buy and read the entire book. A book blurb must spark the reader’s curiosity.

book cover blurb 2

Writing a blurb

A blurb should not be more than 150 words. Before you start study lots of back cover blurbs in your own or a book shop’s shelves. Note words and quotes and phrases that give instant appeal, atmosphere, an air of mystery, a sense of character, a sense of place and  then look at the plot of your book and rework the words until they blend together in an exciting way.See what appeals to you the most, which blurbs grab you the most? When writing a blurb – first, you must determine the market for your story. The blurb should then be written in a way that shows your potential reader what you will deliver.

It is important to have a brilliant opening line, or hook which will do exactly that. The blurb should end with a reason for the reader to buy / read your book; this can be in the form of a statement or a provocative question.

A novel, it should promise a fabulous, entertaining read.  A blurb for a Non-Fiction or self-help book should  appeal to the reader’s interest.

Get testimonials

Once you mastered writing your own book blurb, it will help your pitch if you can get testimonials from well-known writers, magazines or people. You will find that some are willing to help and others will just ignore you – keep knocking on doors until you find someone who will.

 

 

The 5 core elements of a good book blurb

 

The perfect hook

 

Think of the first sentence of your book blurb as your hook. It needs to be new, clever and engaging—something that will make a potential reader want to know more.

You could introduce your main characters by focusing on the precarious predicament in which they find themselves. But avoid clichés, inject your own style right from the beginning.

Talk about your characters – have the confidence to bring them to life in your blurb. Show them in their best or most interesting light and give them dimension. Talk about the dilemma your characters are facing, give your reader a reason to care or be interested enough to find out more:

Write the blurb for the audience you want and be honest—you don’t want to mislead readers – that is the quickest way to get your book tossed to one side.

 

Don’t give the plot away in the blurb.

You want your potential reader to buy your book, so try not to give away too much of the plot. You need to find  that fine line between revealing enough for your reader to want to know more and maintaining that air of mystery.

Once you have them keep them wanting more

You have succeeded in creating enough intrigue for a reader to want to continue. Finish the blurb with a cliff-hanger—rather unsubtly and invite people to find out more.

You could end with a question, but this certainly isn’t essential. The point is to make your ending count and leave the reader feeling desperate to find out what happens.

You have just spent months, possibly years writing a book – do it justice by spending the time on writing the most effective blurb possible so you can share your soul with those who are really worthy.

 

 

Working with horses? YOU need to write a book

insructor 1

Have you ever thought about writing a book? If you haven’t got time to write, or don’t know where to start Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing have ghost writers who will do that for you.

If you are involved in any equestrian business working for yourself you will know just how hard it is to find and keep customers. Adverts are expensive and almost as soon as they appear their impact is lost.

There is a way that you can promote yourself however that will last and last. Writing a book can have a huge impact on your business, since it will act as a terrific promotional tool. No matter what type of business you are involved in, from owning a tack shop, livery yard, teaching or doing equine therapy, there is always something that you can write about which will show your depth of knowledge to an interested audience.

instructor 2

A book has the added benefit of being something that you can give as a promotional gift to clients, something that will be borrowed and make its way through a wide audience. Writing a book can also lead onto further strings to your bow, speaking engagements or maybe even a regular column in the equestrian press.

ins 3

A book will boost your business in the following ways:-

• Enhanced Credibility – Being the author of a book gives you a level of credibility like nothing else. Clients and potential clients will see you as an expert when you have written books on a subject.

• Increased Knowledge – If you do it right, the very act of researching and writing a book will increase your knowledge of a particular field.

• Increased Client Base – Many business owners say that having authored a book helps them get clients and increase their fees. After having written a book many business owning authors reported an increase in client enquiries. Being a book author is a great way to make your talents stand out from others in the same field.

• Advertising – A book acts as a great, although slightly expensive business card. Without exception clients are thrilled to be handed a copy of a book you have written and the very fact that you are the author implies that you know what you are talking about.

• New Income Stream – Selling the book to clients who may want to share your knowledge soon creates an income stream separate from your actual business.

• Marketing and PR. – A book expands your possibilities for marketing and public relations, because you have stood up as an expert people are more likely to come to you for quotes and to take part in articles and radio and tv shows, This of course in turn has the effect of getting your name ‘out there’.

If you need help with any book project  either publishing or ghost writing please contact Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing – we would love to help you succeed.

Anyone can write – but not everyone can become an author

Manuscript Assessment
Manuscript Assessment

 

Writing a book – or a short story is an incredible achievement. No one should ever underestimate the discipline and sacrifice that has gone into turning an idea into reality. But, something that I, as an editor, come up with time and time again, writer’s often don’t realise that it is the revision and re-writing of the story that makes it a great novel. The harsh reality is that honestly – anyone can write a book – it is just a matter of hitting the computer keys and churning out words. It is the revision and re-writing that turns words into a book that readers will love.

The publishing world has opened up to writers. Getting your book published is no longer an impossible task. Now absolutely anyone can write a book and download it to a self-publishing web site.

Unfortunately this also means that a lot of books that shouldn’t be published are available for anyone to read. Knowledgeable souls in the publishing world continually advise self-publishers to get help with editing, and not just copyediting but story editing too.

While some authors are thrilled to have another eye helping mould their words into a story some writers are horrified and disappointed when their manuscript is returned covered in comments and queries from the editor. Do a little research into the professional lives of any well-known author and you will find that the reality is that they re-write and re-write and sometimes re-write again until the book is good enough.

The first draft of a book is where the ideas just pour out of your imagination, fingers fly over the keyboard and of course everyone who reads the book will tell you that it is utterly brilliant. Except  unless you are a literary genius the first draft of your book is undoubtedly just that – a vague impression of the wonderful story that it could become.

An editor will go through your book and identify problems in the plot and with grammar and comprehension, but anyone wanting to write a good novel should revise their work first.

It is hard to go back through a manuscript that you have toiled over – and look at it with an unbiased eye, but this is what you must do. It can help to put the manuscript away for a week or two and then come back to it refreshed and able to look at it objectively.

Re-read and as you do check the following pointers:-

Is the story boring? if you are bored re-reading, it’s not because you’ve read that section so many times, it’s because it’s boring. Good writing is always engaging, even after reading it over and over. We reread favourite books.  The worst offense a writer can commit is to be boring.

Cut up your story. Use a note pad and summarise each chapter and scene. Lay these out on the floor or a wall. Check that the order of the information contributes to tension/suspense. Also, think about the length of each piece, check that it is contributing to the pacing and rhythm of the story. This way you should be able to see where a scene is too slow, or where it ends too quickly.

Check what the reader learns in each section. Ideally, they should continue learning things about the characters or action, in order to increase the  stakes, desire, conflict, etc. until the story moves toward an ending.

Look at your writing style:-  Have you used the same words over and over again? Look at your use of language – check that you are showing the reader the action, not telling them.

In each paragraph, look at opening sentence and last sentence in particular. Important things in the moment should go at the beginning or end. Grab the reader with good opening lines on each paragraph and leave them longing for more at the end of it.

Have you got the tone of speech correct? Indirect speech for voice. Direct speech for drama. Indirect for information.  Don’t be blunt with speech,  make sure it has bearing on how a real person would talk, intersperse action with dialogue to move things along.   ‘The stable is there.’ Would be better written ‘she dismounted from the sweating horse and pointed towards the stable, or she walked towards the stable tangling her hands in the horse’s mane etc.

Consider the  backstory: can it fit into the dialogue somewhere, where someone else’s interest in it can bring it out, increasing our own, as well as making it a direct concern in the present of the story rather than ‘telling the reader.

These are minor points that should be considered before you submit your book to an editor. Revision and rewriting is all part of the process.

Just like a parent it is impossible to see the flaws in a book you have spent many hours, even years toiling over. And yet the worst thing a writer can do is to finish their book, check it over for spelling mistakes and unleash it on an unsuspecting world. Unfortunately this can result in your name being linked to a rubbish book which doesn’t show off your talents. Every writer, even the big name writers of well- known bestsellers work with editors who check over their manuscript and hone it until it reaches perfection.

As the author of any book you will find it impossible to see any flaws in it. No matter how hard you try it is impossible to ‘see’ the glaring errors that a reader will quickly point out to you. There could be flaws in the plot, or in your time line, making characters arrive somewhere before they have left. While writing you won’t be able to spot these as in your mind the story is accurate. You may have seen the spelling lists where some of the letters are jumbled up and yet you still read the word which is meant to be there because the eye assumes it knows what is there. Even a spell check on a computer won’t pick this up as there are many words that are incorrect in the context of the manuscript and yet are spelt right. There and their know and now for instance would not be picked up by a spell checker.

The unbiased eye of a good book editor will check that the horse at the centre of the story is chestnut the whole way through the book instead of changing to grey half way through. An editor they will wonder if daffodils should be blooming in September and make sure that all of the threads in your book are followed to a proper conclusion. What has happened to the farrier who was knocked over by a loose horse in chapter three? Has he played his role in the book properly, or will the reader be left wondering what happened to him.

As a writer you have no doubt in your mind the motivation behind your character’s actions. Often though, in writing this is not shown properly to the reader leaving them confused and frustrated. With so many books available it is important that your writing not only keeps readers entertained, but that they also enjoy the experience. You might know, as the writer, why a character is afraid of her horse, but unless the character is properly portrayed the reader might see her as feeble and unlikable and quickly lose patience with the book.

The most enjoyable part of writing a book is actually sitting at the computer and seeing the characters come to life. You have spent time planning, got to know your characters and settings inside out, worked out the plot – the actual writing is the fun part. Once you have typed THE END as your story reaches its conclusion the first thing you want to do is to share what you are sure is a work of genius with the world. But hold on – it’s actually time to get to work now, pruning, revising, perfecting. It is essential to do this work with an editor, the professional, unbiased eye that can take your book and turn it into something truly unforgettable.

Competition details

Short_Story_Comp_2014[1]

EQUESTRIAN SHORT STORY COMPETITION 2014

Have you always dreamed of being an equestrian author? Do you want to help equestrian charity World  Horse Welfare? Are you a budding Jilly Cooper or the new Dick Francis? Well here is your chance to enter your story in a new Equestrian Short Story Competition sponsored by Haynet and Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing.  This could be the start of a new chapter in your life writing fiction in the equestrian world.

The judges are looking for equestrian themed short stories of approximately 6,000 words long accompanied by a 500 word synopsis. Entrants can let their imagination run wild as long as the subject matter has an equestrian theme. The sponsors would like to see stories that have an equestrian background rather solely about just being a horse. Maybe a crime novel set in the horse world or perhaps a fantasy novel or an equestrian Harry Potter? How about an equestrian romance which is ideal for the Jilly Cooper addicts!

The winning story will have their story published in a form of an e-book which can be purchased and downloaded by the public with donation going to the wonderful equine charity World Horse Welfare. The winner will also receive a fantastic Haynet hoody. Two runners up will also have their stories published.

Judges, Lavender & White Equestrian Publishing have a wealth of publishing knowledge and experience in equestrian journalism spanning decades. Haynet is a well-known equestrian blogging network with members from all over the world writing about their lives with horses.

Submissions to The Equestrian Short Story Competition 2014 will be accepted from Tuesday 13th May 2014 and will run for three months giving author’s time to pen, edit and proof read their equine stories. The final deadline is 5pm (GMT) on Monday 11th August 2014.

Further details, plus terms and conditions can be found at http://www.hay-net.co.uk/equestrian-short-story-competition-2014. Please submit your entry by email to haynetblog@hotmail.co.uk

For more details please contact Samantha Hobden from Haynet via email: haynetblog@gmail.com or Jacqueline Smalley from Lavender and White Equestrian Publishing on info@lavenderandwhite.co.uk

www.hay-net.co.uk

www.lavenderandwhite.co.uk

www.worldhorsewelfare.org